Thursday, August 27, 2015

Gig #85: Of late 25: Helena Hauff, Midday Veil, Fuck the Facts, MXLX, Mercury Rev, Kuedo, Helen, Erraunt, Tallesen, Low, WOLD, Chelsea Wolfe, Slayer, Okkyung Lee












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Helena Hauff Sworn To Secrecy Part II
'Helena Hauff executes a strong 2nd album of one-take machine workouts ranging from icy, beat-less moments to hi-NRG and darkwave pop with Discreet Desires for Werk Discs/Ninja Tune. Arriving 6 months after her very limited debut, A Tape, by contrast this effort is a far more polished and organised affair, but still with the requisite amounta muck under her talons' chipped lacquer. It offers ten tracks, each improvised and recorded at her bedroom studio in Hamburg and tested on the road between her countless international DJ gigs and closer to home at Golden Püdel. In a marked difference to all her previous releases, it sounds like she's just got a posher bit of hardware, buoying the whole album with super wide basslines whilst her Roland rhythms bite and jab with patented venom. If we're picking highlights, the salty NRG lash of 'Piece of Pleasure' is a must, as are the darkwave jag of 'Sworn To Secrecy Part II' and the Dopplereffekt-like cadence of 'Silver Sand & Boxes of Mould'.' -- Bookman






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Midday Veil Empire is No More
'The band’s preceding full-length album – 2013’s The Current, named one of the year’s best avant-rock releases by The Wire – could be viewed as the band emerging from their kosmische chrysalis, unfurling previously unheard banners of both color and control. This Wilderness is the sound of the band under the self-imposed hypnosis of that emergence, extending the voyage with even more discipline than ever before. The beating musical heart of This Wilderness remains the out-sized synth wizardry of co-founder David Golightly, who seems to have ingested every possible mind-altering sound from Stockhausen to Cybotron to the “Love to Love You” of Donna Summer. They’re all on display here, made especially ornate by the driving percussion of Garrett Moore, the deep, submerging bass of Jayson Kochan, and the often-explosive, reptilian guitar lines of multi-instrumentalist Timm Mason.' -- Beyond Beyond is Beyond






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Fuck the Facts Solitude
'Despite steadily unleashing new material over the past few years, including two EPs and a split, Desire Will Rot is Fuck the Facts' first full-length since 2011's Die Miserable. The new LP from the progressive grindcore warriors is exactly what fans have been waiting for, featuring 11 tracks of the band's unique brand of visceral grind. It's an onslaught of harsh, blazing force, starting with the whiplash-fast opener "Everywhere Yet Nowhere," which contains a surge of aggression that carries on throughout "Shadows Collide." Tracks like "La Mort II" and "Solitude" are blistering and overwhelmingly powerful, but Fuck the Facts' sound is anything but limited. Desire Will Rot is incredibly diverse, containing varied structures and incorporating many different styles and elements: "The Path of Most Resistance" has a groove-based approach and "La Mort I" is melody-centric, while "Storm of Silence" features a punk vibe and "Circle" is characterized by experimental noise.' -- Exclaim






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MXLX O Faithful Erection
'In two years Matt Loveridge has released over twenty albums/EP’s, spilt over different aliases Klad Hest, Fairhorns, Gnar Hest, Knife Liibrary, Speed the Plough, Matt Williams and now MXLX, as well as being a member of BEAK. Not bad going, his latest album, Go Away, released through the excellent French label Valeur d’usage Records, is a lo-fi ambient acoustic affair (Loveridge calls the music Autistic Blues). This is a fair description as his music is abstract and sketch like in places, some tracks consisting of nothing more than beautiful chord progressions, laced with a misty drone. In Loveridge’s own words this was born of “Combination of misery and poverty and having nothing else to do brought this record on”, an apt description, but there is beauty here too.' -- god is in the tv






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Mercury Rev Queen of Swans
'Mercury Rev's The Light In You is filled with wondrous and voluminous kaleidoscopic detail, but also intimate moments of calm, and altogether stands up to the very best that this notable band of maverick explorers has ever created. Its ecstatic highs and shivery comedowns also reflect a particularly turbulent era in the lives of Grasshopper and fellow co-founder Jonathan Donahue, of calamities both personal and physical, but also rebirths and real births (Grasshopper became a father for the first time in 2014). There’s a reason for the seven-year gap since the band’s last album, Snowflake Midnight. “It was one of those otherworldly life sequences, when everything you think is solid turns molten,” explains Jonathan. “But also, when something is worth saying, it can take a long time to say it, rather than just blurt it out.”' -- Bella Union






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Kuedo Boundary Regulation
'We can see the same efficient production in the general drama-dynamics of Kuedo’s Assertion of a Surrounding Presence. Its swelling pads, gamelan, and titular images form a swill of affect primed for sound systems that are themselves capitalized by the counter-market of counterculture. The record pairs relatively accessible music with a disruptive language and agenda. Tracks like “Vertical Stack” weep with a hyper-pathos that pull spindly synth riffs over Reichian bass runs and soaring flute, literally mobilizing an ambient storm of “unbending futurist focus” key to Kuedo’s agenda. That agenda is described as a hyperreal spatialization of genre, specifically footwork, drill, and techno; these are surrounding presences becoming “asserted” as focused affect — something charged, powerful, even emotional regarding its approach to “the zeitgeist.” The ambience is honed in sharp tracks like “Boundary Regulation,” a brill cut that features Night Slugs affiliate Egyptrixx, or “Border State Collapse,” where spatial resonance is tempered by Kuedo’s signature skittering hi-hats. The tracks are quick, incisive, and full of mass appeal.' -- Tiny Mix Tapes






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Helen Motorcycle
'In case you missed their excellent 7″ single from a couple years back, Liz Harris of Grouper also plays in a “pop group” called Helen with some Portland friends (Jed Bindeman of Eternal Tapestry + Scott Simmons of Eat Skull). The band has just announced their debut LP, and today they unveil the awesome lead single: “Motorcycle” starts off with all the beautiful, delicate haze of a Dragging a Dead Deer Up a Hill-era Grouper song, before erupting into a glorious, blown-out fuzz-pop jam. Helen’s the original faces — which also features previous tracks “Felt This Way” + “Dying All the Time“ — is out September 4 on Kranky.' -- collaged






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Erraunt The Portent
'The Portent is the debut release by Chicago one-man atmospheric black metal outfit Erraunt. In technical terms, there are lots of odd but seemingly deliberate choices of melody and note placement — like major 7th intervals that imply a certain key or chord followed by notes that establish a completely different key center — that constantly throw the listener off and reveal composer Oneiric’s penchant for unorthodox arrangements and song structures. The only thing I can possibly compare it to is a mixture of the softer portions of Emperor’s Anthems to the Welkin at Dusk and the unrelenting difficulty of Paysage d’Hiver’s noisy layering. The Portent constantly and intentionally finds itself at the junction of “atmospheric” and “unhinged,” with Oneiric meticulously driving the listener further and further away from recognizable repetition in melody and rhythm. I have no idea what his artistic background is, but one gets the sense that this is far from his first rodeo.' -- Reign in Blog






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Tallesen Emmel
'Tallesen wants to make his audience move. Especially with inca. Because a lot of his music is audibly contorted and melted, stretched and stifled, etc. and etc., bodies tap or move (uncontrollably, even) to a potentially non-existent, perhaps constantly decaying rhythm. Yet, as Tallesen tries to shift both with and without this confinement of beat, there’s an insatiable twitch inside us that wants to move with one or all melodies, a fleshy desire for audible nihilism. inca is progressive club, dabbed and tabbed into a lush neon light, flickering to a broken metronome in a trash-bagged window, emitting dense smoke from every seam: it steams for your arrival, and it’s looking to create some dance-floor transcendence.' -- Tiny Mix Tapes






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Low What Part of Me
'Despite the purity of their configuration — Sparhawk on guitar and vocals, Parker on drums and vocals, and a bass player (currently Steve Garrington) — Low’s catalog is surprisingly diverse. While pristine minimalism and Sparhawk and Parker’s dolorous vocal harmonies have always been at the core of the band’s aesthetic, working with a variety of producers over the years (Kramer, Steve Fisk, Steve Albini, Dave Fridmann) has managed to push and pull the band’s sound in interesting directions. 2013’s The Invisible Way — produced by Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy — was widely considered the most classically Low-sounding album the band had released in years: a missive that pretty evenly split the difference between the plaintive nature of the band’s early work and the ragged noisiness and sonic experimentation of later releases. Ones And Sixes largely continues that theme. Produced by BJ Burton, the record nicely balances the band’s trademark immediacy (“Into You” and “Kid In The Corner”) with more sprawling, experimental fare (the blistering, nearly 10-minute “Landslide” or “DJ,” a track that could be a spiritual cousin to Trust’s “Shots & Ladders”). Throughout the record, electronic flourishes bubble under the surface while the cavernous-sounding guitars rip and echo around the corners.' -- Stereogum






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WOLD Sol
'Freermasonry:— the obliterative sixth album from Wold, the Saskatchewan act led by the incredibly named Fortress Crookedjaw-- is ultimately enigmatic and entirely unknowable, an intersection of noise, metal, and electronics that doesn't yield to such plainclothes criticism. Mean, dense and multivalent, with a lyrical conceit based on Masonic symbolism and Biblical scripture, it's the rare loud music that begs to be louder still if you're to have any chance of understanding it. Freermasonry: is a case study in controlling the illusion of chaos, an elegantly constructed nightmare of sound where hearing one layer of serrated screams, static bursts, and feedback flares means you've missed some mass of activity somewhere else. Weirdly seductive rhythms tumble beneath a laundromat of blown-out tones and crackling vocals, generally pulling your attention a dozen different ways. I've been listening to the album consistently for three months now, and somehow, I'm still surprised by what its 58 minutes sound like and accomplish. Paradoxically disorienting and direct, Freermasonry: is a constant tumult of surprising activity, more unforgiving than most everything in the noise, metal, and drone scenes, places where Wold kind of fits.' -- Grayson Currin






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Chelsea Wolfe Carrion Flowers
'Abyss is as black and as grim as its name would suggest. The bass line that introduces album-opener “Carrion Flowers” recalls Sunn O))) in its density and minimalism. It rumbles like the warning growl of some infernal beast about to slip its chain, untamed and untamable, even as the rest of the instrumentation — the scraped guitars, the plodding drums, the moaning synth — struggle to hem it in on all sides. At odds with the ugliness surrounding her stands Wolfe herself. Her voice reverberates like that of a nightingale swallowed whole, crying for rescue from within the song’s monstrous belly. Abyss may be Wolfe’s heaviest set to date, abetted perhaps by the presence of Russian Circles’ guitarist Mike Sullivan, who lends an axe to the album’s most crushing tracks. Wolfe has stated that many of the songs were inspired by her lifelong affliction with sleep paralysis, an experience of immobility while in a semiconscious state that is often accompanied by nightmarish hallucinations. I can’t comprehend the terror of such an affliction, to be so viciously betrayed by both mind and body, but the immensity of songs like “Dragged Out” and “Iron Moon” evoke a similar sense of helplessness in the listener, like we too are rendered prostrate before forces beyond our comprehension and control.' -- Tiny Mix Tapes






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Slayer Repentless
'We started this process, like, four years ago [before Jeff died]. It's been a long time coming. We started with the idea that we needed to do an album — well, our management was, like, 'You know, it's about time you guys do another record.' and we said, 'Oh, okay.' [Laughs] So we start working on ideas and put together some new songs, and then four years later, a lot has happened. Kerry [King, guitar] had a lot of stuff written, and Jeff was working ideas out, but he was very limited because he had a tough time playing his guitar. Jeff was always writing music, so he had demos and stuff that he liked, and he started cutting and pasting those together and trying to make them work. So, we had a lot of material already, but I was a little apprehensive, because Jeff and Kerry wrote the music for SLAYER. We all contributed to the lyrics, but music was written between the two of them. So you have half of SLAYER — musically you have half of SLAYER — and physically you have two-thirds of SLAYER, so it's a big percentage of the band. Two-thirds is still a big percentage, and, like I said, I was a little apprehensive because they each wrote differently, so it would be a lopsided wheel, you know what I mean?' -- Tom Araya





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Okkyung Lee The Crow Flew After Yi Sang
'A native of Korea, cellist/composer Okkyung Lee has been developing her unique voice in both improvised and composed music by blending her wide interests and influences. Since moving to New York in 2000, she has worked with numerous artists ranging from Laurie Anderson, David Behrman, Douglas Gordon, Vijay Iyer, Christian Marclay, Jim O’Rourke, Evan Parker and John Zorn just to name a few, while leading her own projects and releasing more than 20 albums and touring extensively in the US and Europe. Okkyung was a recipient of Foundation for Contemporary Arts Grant in 2010. Ghil was recorded and produced by the Norwegian artist Lasse Marhaug. Instead of recording in what has become the standard in modern contempoary music, with high-end equipment and in controlled studio settings, Marhaug wanted to record Ghil in an expressionistic way – to purposely use crude equipment and unorthodox microphone placement in order to give a more raw and direct depiction of Okkyung playing her music. Marhaug says if it they were making a film, it would be like shooting on grainy 16mm black&white with close-ups instead of 35mm colour cinemascope.' -- Ideologic Organ







*

p.s. Hey. If anyone reading this is now or will be in Paris around September 11th, tickets have just gone on sale for the world premiere of LIKE CATTLE TOWARDS GLOW, and, if you're 16 years of age or older, you can buy them here. ** Thomas Moore, Hi, T. Nothing better than a zing. Or nothing I can think of. Cool, or, you know, about the tunnel post coaxing a self-examination. New thing for your work's arsenal maybe? That's the way I seem to think about most everything. I'll google Harry Proctor then. I couldn't find anything yesterday. I have that Genesis/Laura Jane thing cued up. Definitely will listen to JS on Bret's thing. I love JS. Cool. Thank you! Friday morning is good. Post-p.s., meaning between, like, 11 am and noon Paris time? Which would be, what, ... 10 and 11 your time? I'll email you my phone # and Skype if you don't have them. ** David Ehrenstein, They're adorable, that's for sure. Shit, I can't even fully open the Hulu page over here. It's blocked in France. Lucky everybody else, though. Everyone, Mr. Ehrenstein has thoughtfully pointed out that for the next four -- or maybe three by now -- days, you in the US of A can watch films by Robert Bresson for absolutely free on Hulu, and since, in my humble opinion, Bresson is greatest artist who ever lived, I obviously highly encourage you to take advantage. Go here. ** Bill, Hi. Sweet about that Mike Kuchar event, yeah, Envy. Yes, I was emailed the day of the post from someone who pointed out that it was just a Photoshop job. What a shame. It's a good job, but if you really look close, there are total implausibilities here and there. Dang. ** Bernard Welt, Hi, B. A McDowell Day from you would obviously rock everything. Yeah, of course, the raid on Rentboy was a total shock, really blind-siding. Which, yeah, lends it to theorizing galore. I wonder if the actual 'why' will come out. Really, really fucked and mind boggling. Luckily, I guess, I haven't seen any of the gay-on-gay bashing of sex workers that you say is going on. Not a surprise, disgustingly, though. I would guess that, unless this renders them gun-shy, the resorts can migrate to men4rentnow, or whatever Rentboy's main competitor is called exactly. No, I had not read that Jacques Audiard is adapting Patrick's novel. Holy shit, that's amazing! Wow! I'm really excited for Patrick's soon to be released new novel. That Pattinson guy is really turning his career around, isn't he? I have yet to understand exactly what excellent filmmakers like Denis see in him, but it's a really nice thing to see him do for some reason. ** Steevee, Hi. Yeah, I too have not seen any of the escort-bashing by gay guys. So depressing when centric gay guys' small-mindedness and geriatric morals are yanked into the fore, but good to know, I guess. ** Étienne, Hi! Glad you came back! If it makes a difference, my experiences in French bookstores when it is revealed to the employees that the guy (me) buying some complicated French tome doesn't speak French, is that the discrepancy seems to charm their pants off. I'm sure there's some condescension in that charm explosion, but, being the Francophile that I am, I don't mind a little humbling. I'm so totally on board with your love affair with Paris. I've been here for-almost-ever-now, and I'm still like you. So I encourage you to embrace and wallow in that love, not that you need the slightest encouragement. Double cheek kiss. ** Torn porter, Mr. Porter! You're here in Paris right this second? Whoa. Is it raining cats and dogs this morning or what? Oh, yeah, let's hang. Best for me would be, like, Friday or over the weekend sometime because then I take off for Geneva for a bit. Write or text or call me, and let's sort it. Do you still have my email and phone #? See you soon, man. Hey to Ratty! ** _Black_Acrylic, Hi, Ben. I think you'll like the Kuchars stuff, Just a guess, but that feels right. No, seeing their stuff on DVD is good. Or you can use the links in the post or search the Kuchars on youtube/Vimeo. There are a fair number of their films available to stream/watch online. ** H, Hi. Okay, sounds good. Thank you! ** Misanthrope, Right, I get it, about he word 'fakery'. Maybe 'scripted', 'choreographed'. Man, we tried hard to find the entrance to the tunnel. We looked at old maps, even conferred with the people who did the architectural changes on the building, and the the thing is there, but the entrance is not marked anywhere. But if anybody can find it, it's you, eagle-eye. I sure made forts, or, rather, tunnels, as a kid, not just in the living room either. In the kitchen, the bathroom, you name it. ** Nemo, Hi, Joey. Cool that you guys'll get to meet the one and only and singular Nick Hudson. Give him a bear hug on my behalf please. Well, bad pay aside, that's cool that she was offered the NYU gig, no? Big hi and more back to Jarrod! ** Chris Dankland, Cool, cool, about the blog's ensconced films getting you into them. Loved the videos. Your talent is a mega thing, if you don't know. Hopefully you, at the very least, suspect that's the case. ** Brendan, Oh, 1st and 2nd, but ... wobblingly (that's not a word?) so. I think, I hope, I think I'll get to LA in October at some point for some Halloween spooky house exploration. I'm trying to sort out if and how and when now, but it looks pretty good. Assuming they're still in season play then, hitting the Stadium would be positively and tearfully nice. Love to you, B-ster. ** Armando, Hi. No, shit, I haven't read them yet, which is horrible of me, I'm so sorry, but I've been juggling four big projects at once for the past months, and it's made me worse than usual about doing other things I want and need to do. I'll be in the semi-clear soonish, and my brain will be reopened, if that's okay. So sorry. ** Right. Today's one of those gigs where I present stuff that I'm listening to right now and like enough to try sharing. If you like, find out if our tastes have things in common. See you tomorrow.

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Rerun: Bedsheet, 4 thumb tacks, 16 mm movie projector, 15 folding chairs, and 10 films by or about the Kuchar Brothers (orig. 06/10/08)





Introduction
by John Waters

George and Mike Kuchar's films were my first inspiration. George's ''Hold Me While I'm Naked,'' Mike's ''Sins of the Fleshapoids'' -- these were the pivotal films of my youth, bigger influences than Warhol, Kenneth Anger, even ''The Wizard of Oz.'' As a Baltimore teenager in the mid-60's, I initially read about these filmmaking brothers from the Bronx in Jonas Mekas's Village Voice column, Movie Journal. Here were directors I could idolize -- complete crackpots without an ounce of pretension, outsiders to even ''underground'' sensibilities who made exactly the films they wanted to make, without any money, starring their friends. Devouring my favorite magazine of the time, Film Culture, I learned more about their entirely original work, the lurid plot lines, their home-grown movie goddesses, the ludicrous thrift-store costuming -- it was enough to make me run away to New York to actually see one of their opuses.

Boy, was I not disappointed. There it was on the silver screen -- the Kuchars' famous low-rent Douglas Sirk lighting, the melodramatic soundtracks stolen from bad Hollywood films, male and female nudity. A vision so peculiar, so hilarious, good-natured and proudly pitiful that I realized (with a little help from LSD) that I too could make the films of my dreams. The Kuchar brothers gave me the self-confidence to believe in my own tawdry vision. I went back to Baltimore, renamed a neighborhood friend Divine and made my first real trash epic, ''The Roman Candles.''

The real heyday of ''underground movies'' didn't last long in the 60's, but the Kuchar brothers have managed to survive with their sense of humor and original style intact. They didn't want to cross over. They still make funny, sexy, insanely optimistic films and videos every day of their lives, and nobody tells them what to do or how to make it more ''commercial.'' The Kuchars may be the only real underground filmmakers left working in American today.

Come on, MacArthur grant committee. What are you waiting for? Every year I expect to see the Kuchars' names on the list of your so-called genius awards, but so far no luck. If they don't deserve it, who does?

-- from 'Reflections From a Cinematic Cesspool'



1.



Mike Kuchar 'The Craven Sluck' (1967)


'The Craven Sluck seems like a practical primer for John Water's mischievous Mondo Trasho as well as his far more accomplished Multiple Maniacs. Like Mondo, Sluck is shot in black and white, features a blousy blond out cruising for men, and deals with wholly desperate and debauched characters. Maniacs uses Kuchar's unconventional narrative style, along with an equally surreal yet satisfying ending to create artistic anarchy. The best part about Sluck is its star. Forty-plus year old Floraine Connors (a Kuchar company member) does her best bombshell gone to seed shimmy as the sexually frustrated spouse of a bumbling bloated husband. Her silent scenes (dialogue was later dubbed in to give some semblance of a storyline), including a couple of inspired "glamour fits" are absolutely hilarious and she really wants to come across as the middle-aged answer to Marilyn Monroe. Unfortunately, she's more like Mamie Van Doren circa an episode of Fantasy Island. Still, we want to follow this flubbery femme if only because her passions practically pulsate off the screen.' -- Bill Gibron, DVD Talk









2.

Watch George Kuchar's 'Corruption of the Damned'


'Kuchar's films are overtly insane. Anyone who lived in such a world would be mad inside an hour. Perhaps the Marx Brothers might survive, but I doubt it. Godzilla, King of the Monsters, might have a better chance. But the utter insanity, the insanity of perverted cliche, is the genuine unwholesome appeal of Kuchar's outlook. CORRUPTION might seethe with violence and sex, the two most attractive things you can put on the screen, but beneath them a twisted outlook pervades. Something is very much wrong with the Kuchar world.' -- Leonard Lipton, Berkeley Barb 1965









3.

George Kuchar 'Wild Night in El Reno' (1977)


'This short film by George Kuchar may be the best thing I've seen by the master of madcapped melodrama. Rather than camping it up, Kuchar takes a more experimental, artistic approach to document one of his many yearly trips to Oklahoma. While there Kuchar camps out in a cut-rate motel, explores the landscape, and waits for the storms to roll in. Using carefully composed shot images of the weather outside his window, the layout of his hotel room, and some chuckle inducing stills of vulgar graffiti, Kuchar creates a personal cinematic scrapbook. Layered overtop of these images are snippets of sounds taken from Hollywood melodramas and news reports.' -- Made out of Mouth









4.

Mike Kuchar 'Sins of the Fleshapoids' (1965)


'Along with Anger's SCORPIO RISING and Warhol's CHELSEA GIRLS, Mike Kuchar's SINS OF THE FLESHAPOIDS remains one of the most influential films of the '60s American Underground. Mike and his brother George (who co-wrote FLESHAPOIDS), were the godfathers of bargain basement cinema, pioneering a hilariously campy, lurid style between Ed Wood exploitation and Douglas Sirk melodrama. Set a million years in the future, after “The Great War” has scourged the planet, mankind has forsaken science for self-indulgence in all the carnal pleasures afforded by art, food, and lust. Work is left to a race of enslaved androids. One rebellious male robot (Bob Cowan) tires of pampering his lazy masters, and joins the humans in sin.' -- Other Cinema









5.





George Kuchar 'Pagan Rhapsody' (1970)


'Since this was Jane Elford and Lloyd Williams' first big acting roles, I made the music very loud so it would sweep them to stardom. She once hurt Bob Cowan's back by sitting on it so this time I had her laying on his stomach. Donna Kerness was pregnant during her scenes but her stomach was kept pretty much in shadow and it's not noticeable. My stomach was the same as always except it contained more mocha cake than usual since that type of cake was usually around when I filmed in Brooklyn Heights. Being that the picture was made in the winter, there are no outdoor scenes because it's too cold and when the characters have to suddenly flee a tense situation, it's too time consuming to have them put on a coat and gloves. Originally not scheduled as a tragedy, things swiftly changed as the months made me more and more sour as I plummet down that incinerator shaft I call my life.' -- George Kuchar









6.

George Kuchar's 'I, An Actress' (1977)


'I, an Actress features Kuchar as a teacher in San Francisco showing an acting student how things should be done. It’s hilarious and self-explanatory], so instead of saying more about it, and because it features Kuchar in his real-life role, I’ll quote a few lines from Kuchar’s essay “Teaching Film” about realism: 'Realism only comes to the screen when the film jams in the projector and the image begins to bubble. An instinctual fear of the dark manifests when the projection light fails…heightened by the little furry things with long tails that scamper beneath the seats. The electrical nature of sex becomes apparent as the hair on your neck bristles when that pervert to your left makes knee contact. In these moments of truth, cinema reveals her face of realism'.' -- Douglas Crimp









7.

Mike Kuchar 'Definitely No, Possibly Yes' (1:45)


'Mike Kuchar's video of a downtown NY art gallery opening on Halloween' -- Artflux



8.





George Kuchar 'Butter Balls' (2003)


'I made two films working with film and theater students as my collaborating cast and crew. To counteract the talkie I had done with graduate student the day before, this undergrad project has no dialogue but just a steady stream of images we dreamed up on the spot. A psychodrama that's heavy on the beefcake, our picture deals with the sexual dementia of a sex addict undergoing hypnotherapy. It's a mixture of fantasy and desire with some animals thrown in and lots of strange angles of the leading actor's attributes.' -- George Kuchar









9.

This is George Kuchar: The Making of Queen Konga' (2006)










10.

A short interview with Mike Kuchar, 2007 (8:13)















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p.s. Hey. ** David Ehrenstein, Hi. I won't, although it'll have to get to French Netflix or mubi before I do, I reckon. How could I have missed 'Transatlantic Tunnel'? Everyone, if you want more tunnel, here is a feature film from 1935 wherein team of international scientists and engineers attempt to build a tunnel under the ocean called 'Transatlantic Tunnel', courtesy of Mr. E. ** Bill, B! That mole's nose is psycho. And Joel Miggler may be as well, who knows, but, hey, hats off. ** Brendan, No doubt several times. My B.S. story, I mean. Hope you like the book. I miss Skylight. Give the little tree a tug for me. The D's and the G's suck? I'm out of it. The Diamondbacks, eh? But ... but ... Randy Johnson pitched for them, so ... That's the best I can do on their behalf. I miss Dodger stadium. Eat a $15 bean burrito for me too. ** _Black_Acrylic, Eliasson talking in-depth with Jeff Mills? That's very interesting and curious. I look forward to that too. That Festival sounds very nice. Dundee definitely has its share of really interesting stuff. Cool. ** Steevee, Hi. Zachary Quinto is one of those people for whom the camera does wonders. Seeing an ear, nose and throat specialist certainly makes a whole lot of sense. Good luck with that, Steve. ** Bernard Welt, Hi. B! The first four seconds of that 'kiss' film look really pretty. That's all I've watched so far. What I mean is, I'm not saying it's great for four seconds and then falls apart. Everyone, Not enough tunnels yet even after watching Mr. E's tunnel suggestion? Then I heartily recommend you click this, leading to a 1:13 long film-ette from 1899 called 'A Kiss in the Tunnel', and then, go ahead and put a cherry on the top of the tunnel theme by clicking this, leading to the brief (0:35) famous tunnel scene-ette in Hitchcock's 'North by Northwest', both treats coming straight from the suggestion box of Bernard Welt. Morning! ** Thomas Moronic, It's always interesting when my themed days accidentally intersect with you guys' fears. I mean, apologies to y'all. Complicated apologies. Oh, I got your email! Thank you! I've been wondering with bated breath if/when volume 10 would materialize. Due to the fact that I'll be away (in Geneva for the 'TVC' English language premiere) and the blog will be in reruns for part of next week, I've slotted in your post for the soonest good berth: Tuesday, September 8th. Set your alarm clock. Friday for talking would be good, yes. What's a good time on your end? I've been following the UK scandal general, but I didn't catch what happened yesterday. I'll go find out. ** Étienne, Bonjour to you Étienne! Welcome, and thank you, and welcome again! Um, gosh, I don't know, bookstore-wise. My French is extremely shitty, so I can't read French books, so I rarely venture through bookstores' hallowed entrances. But, when I do, my favorite Paris French-books bookstore is Les Cahiers de Colette, 23 Rue Rambuteau, 75004. Maybe they have my books 'cos it's a good place. I would guess that the gay bookstore Les Mots a la Bouche would have stuff by me in stock. 6 Rue Sainte-Croix de la Bretonnerie, 75004. This is a great city. I would call it the greatest, I think. Are you here to visit or to plant yourself lengthily? Nice to meet you. Come back, please. ** Misanthrope, Hi. Oh, gosh, you're welcome, thank you. That channel does sound like a sweet deal, but I really have to stay away from addictive things because I have massive amounts of things I need to do. I haven't even started a new video game in forever, which is literally physically painful. Or you jump 20 feet from a ladder and the camera angle makes it appear that you landed on -- or entirely on -- the guy. I mean, yeah, there is definitely realness in there somewhere, but it is jam-packed with fakery, man. I mean, come on. I'm sure actors stub their toes and twist their ankles on the 'Game of Thrones' sets too. I like the fakery. It's like a magic show. I like the fakery a whole lot more than the accidental nose bleeds and stuff. I'm sure I told you that there's a tunnel underneath the Recollets where I used to live that goes all the way to Bastille, which, if you know Paris, is a very long tunnel, but when they transformed the building into the Recollets, they hid or covered up the entrance to the tunnel, and nobody knows how to find it. Zac and I were semi-obsessed with finding it for about six months to no avail. ** Etc etc etc, Hi, Casey. Wow, they're serious editors, aren't they? That's good. That's why they're TNY. (1) I had never heard the term 'web confessional' until you used it. I figured that you made it up. I understand what the term refers to, yeah. I would enlarge your definition to include gifs where the emotional display is an accident rather than a deliberate outpouring, where the emotion is made apparent unknowingly, whether through facial expression or physical movement, and where the deliberation is an act of the person who made the gif. In that sense, the word 'confessional' might be a bit misleading. Or you could say that use both 'confessional' gifs and gifs where the emotional display was the intent of the gif whether it was intent of the subject matter or not. (2) Like I said, I think the 'nondenominational' categories have become literary in the way I used them. I guess I don't see 'documentary' or 'reenactment' as inherently dichotomous to literary form. So, to me, they're all literary works. They're all acts of writing to me because I'm a writer, and I only how to make writing. Some use traditional forms -- story, poem, flash fiction, etc. -- and some of the designations identify the source material I used to make the literary work. But when I designate them as 'documentary' or whatever, I'm not pointing those pieces out as being nonliterary. I'm saying that I consider those pieces to be a 'literary documentary' or whatever. else I'm saying I believe that, by employing gifs as a language, forms not conventionally associated with literature in an automatic way can become literature because the literary gif form can incorporate them just as it can incorporate more traditional written forms, if that makes sense. I hope that helps. Ask more, if need be, and thank you so much again as ever! ** Chris Dankland, Hi, Chris. I love that tunnel snakes video. I feel like I watched it for hours. Someone wrote to me yesterday to say that they've been to that spot in Japan and that the Japanese girl tunnel is a total fake. Shit. Weird, I know that Antihero video you mentioned. It's awesome. I don't why it slipped my mind while post-making. Everyone, Either never mind that thing I said up above about the cherry on top of the tunnel theme or else add another cherry because Chris Dankland would wisely like to direct your attention to this, and, in particular, to what goes on between 14:20 to 15:39 and then after 31:40. I've already seen what he's suggesting you might like to see, and I double his urging. Check it. I watched your short videos yesterday, and they're super great! Big kudos! You're the sharpest! Everyone, Wait, hold on. Much more important and fulfilling than even the just linked-to tunnel video thing, you really, really want to click this. That link leads to 4 short videos that Chris Dankland made about his writing, and I watched them yesterday, and they're fucking great, so do that. Really, seriously. Oh, your crazy amazing guest-post will launch here on the blog on Saturday, September 5th. Thank you so much! After putting that post together and tasting its wares, I have significantly more brain cells now. Hugs, French vibes, fireworks at midnight to you, man. ** H, Hi. Oh, thank you about the post. Mm, interesting question. There have been a very few occasions where I was asked to write about artists I'm not interested in, and where I accepted the job because I either needed the money or because there was some kind of favor involved. But what I did was write the pieces in such a way that they had a respectful tone and quality, and included praise for the artist from others, all without actually technically including any opinion on the work by me, and I just hoped the sleight of hand would work and cause the pieces to do their jobs and be positive things for the artists, and they did do that. But I've never pretended that I liked something that I don't. I haven't read 'Tender Buttons', in, wow, decades. Interesting idea. Your comment was far from boring, and your curiosity and happiness came through loud and clear. Have lovely day. ** Okay. My very busy life right now has impacted the blog to the degree that I am having to give you a rerun post today. However, it, or at least its topic, is a real good one, I promise. See you tomorrow.

Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Tunnels

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Yesterday we brought you the story of the purported "Rape Tunnel," where Rape Artist "Richard Whitehurst" would rape anyone daring to crawl through. Alas, it was just another art hoax. Our field trip is canceled. It became clear one microsecond after our post went up that this was probably a hoax, since none of the people or places featured in the "interview" appeared to have any Google history, which, in the US of A, means you are a fucking fraud.






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One weird area I explored first hand is an abandoned rail line that goes right into one of the cemeteries of Fairview. This line slams right dead into the cemetery, then goes right under it into a tunnel! This tunnel has been abandoned since about the 1960’s, after a little girl was supposedly hit by a train blazing out of the tunnel. It is said that her body was not noticed by the engineer until he reached Pennsylvania.





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Project Tic-Toc is a top secret U.S. government effort to build an experimental time machine, known as "The Time Tunnel" due to its appearance as a cylindrical hallway. The base for Project Tic-Toc is a huge, hidden underground complex in Arizona, 800 floors deep and employing over 36,000 people. The directors of the project are Dr. Douglas Phillips (Robert Colbert), Dr. Anthony Newman (James Darren), and Lt. General Heywood Kirk (Whit Bissell). The specialists assisting them are Dr. Raymond Swain (John Zaremba), a foremost expert in electronics, and Dr. Ann MacGregor (Lee Meriwether), an electro-biologist supervising the unit that determines how much force and heat a time traveler is able to withstand. The series is set in 1968, two years into the future of the actual broadcast season, 1966-67.







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The Gates of Hell





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from THE TUNNEL, by William Gass: My dad wouldn't let me have a dog. A dog? A dog we don't need. My mom made the neighbor's spitz her pal by poisoning it with the gin she sprinkled on the table scraps. Feed it somewhere else, my dad said. A dog we don't need. My dad wouldn't let me have a dog. Our neighbor's spitz--that mutt--he shits in the flower beds. Dog doo we don't need. At least feed it somewhere else, my dad said. My mom made the table scraps tasty for her pal, the neighbor's spitz-- that mutt--by sprinkling them with gin. You're poisoning Pal, my dad said, but never mind, we don't need that mutt. My mom thought anything tasted better with a little gin to salt it up. That way my mom made the neighbor's spitz her pal, and maddened dad who wouldn't let me have a dog. He always said we didn't need one, they crapped on the carpet and put dirty paws on the pant's leg of guests and yapped at cats or anyone who came to the door. A dog? A dog we don't need. We don't need chewed shoes and dog hairs on the sofa, fleas in the rug, dirty bowls in every corner of the kitchen, dog stink on our clothes. But my mom made the neighbor's spitz her pal anyway by poisoning it with the gin she sprinkled on the table scraps like she was baptising bones. At least feed it somewhere else, my dad said. My dad wouldn't let me have a pal. Who will have to walk that pal, he said. I will. And it's going to be snowing or it's going to be raining and who will be waiting by the vacant lot at the corner in the cold wet wind, waiting for the damn dog to do his business? Not you, Billy boy Christ, you can't even be counted on to bring in the garbage cans or mow the lawn. So no dog. A mutt we don't need, we don't need dog doo in the flower beds, chewed shoes, fleas; what we need is the yard raked, like I said this morning. No damn dog. No mutt for your mother either even if she tries to get around me by feeding it when my back is turned, when I'm away at work earning her gin money so the sick thing can shit in a stream on the flower seeds; at least she should feed it somewhere else; it's always hanging around; is it a light string in the hall or a cloth on the table to be always hanging around? No. Chewed shoes, fleas, muddy paws and yappy daddle, bowser odor: a dog we don't need. Suppose it bites the postman: do you get sued? No. I am the one waiting at the corner vacant lot in the rain, the snow, the cold wet wind, waiting for the dog to do his damn business, and I get sued. You don't. Christ, you can't even be counted on to clip the hedge. You know: snicksnack. So no dog, my dad said. Though we had a dog nevertheless. That is, my mom made the neighbor's pal her mutt, and didn't let me have him for mine, either, because it just followed her around--yip nip--wanting to lap gin and nose its grease-sogged bread. So we did have a dog in the house, even though it just visited, and it would rest its white head in my mother's lap and whimper and my father would throw down his paper and say shit! and I would walk out of the house and neglect to mow or rake the yard, or snicksnack the hedge or bring the garbage cans around. My dad wouldn't let me have a dog. A dog? A dog we don't need, he said. So I was damned if I would fetch.



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Train tunnel in Akiabara, Japan







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Tunnel Snakes Rule!!





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Possibly the strangest plan in the history of Czech (O’Slovak) engineering was a tunnel through the Alps that would have allowed Czechoslovaks to access the Mediterranean Sea with their very own beach. The project was proposed by the Soviet Union who occupied the country at the time as a way to coerce the Czech populace into not attempting to flee the repressive regime imposed on the country. The professor of economy Karel Žlábek was forced to design a plan in the 60s to drill a massive tunnel through the Alps and build a heavily guarded artificial peninsula, called “Adriaport”, at the other end. The distance of 350 km was planned to take only 2 hours by train.







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The Icicle Tunnel of Death Weird





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The year was 1993. Jessica Rosenblum, OG hip-hop head, party promoter, and arbiter of downtown cool, had just found a permanent home for her Sunday night rap party, Mecca. It was the perfect place for Funkmaster Flex, the DJ she was managing at the time, to further expand his following. Peter Gatien, the godfather of NYC nightlife, had a year prior acquired a freshly remodeled 80,000-square-foot nightclub, originally the historic Terminal Warehouse Company Central Stores Building (1890-91) where entire train cars would park and unload. It was known as the Tunnel. What happened next, no one could’ve predicted.










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Over the past week we have seen a variety of maps in a number of articles which showed Jade Helm states, bizarre and sudden Walmart closures in 5 locations, a map of Walmarts' General Merchandise Distribution Centers, Foreign Trade Zones and finally, an older map purporting to show an underground tunnel system that spans the whole United States. Today we are going to throw a couple more maps out there, along with the ones shown in previous articles (which will be linked as related articles below) and let readers determine for themselves if the similarities with the Underground Tunnel map, and the maps showing "unexplained, mysterious," booms, hums that have been driving people insane (literally!), and other strange "phenomena" doesn't give them chills running down their spine.






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me and my mates thought it'd be a laugh to do grey lady in coseley tunnel as we've done it plenty of times before but the first time we record this is what happens.





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I've made the Tassaraja Egg White Bread recipe twice now, and both times I've gotten this kind of weird "crack" (for lack of a better term) inside the loaf. It's a tunnel as I know it, I took some pictures tonight after cutting into the fresh loaf I made today. Both times I slashed the top and used an egg wash. I roll my dough before I put it in the pan as I would for Cinnamon Rolls, pressing down on the dough in the pan to flatten it and making sure that it's all smooshy. After the first loaf of this bread where the cracking was severe, this time I *definitely* made sure I sealed the seam. Both sides of the crack are smooth, so they haven't ripped when coming out of the pan. I haven't had this problem with any of the other recipes I've made, only with this particular recipe. I'm very scared. I'm sorry if this post is scattered, I'm fending off my kids trying to involve me in their lives while I gather my thoughts. I hate that. :)






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19 Halloween Haunted House tunnels













skeleton tunnel spooky walls skeletons happy halloween emoticon emoticons animated animation animations gif photo: Skeleton Tunnel Spooky Walls Skeletons Happy Halloween Emoticon Emoticons Animated Animation Animations Gif l_67ab9929831f45b895c41935952f5152.gif









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Entitled Transarquitetônica, this structure is the work of Brazilian artist Henrique Oliveira. Everything starts off inconspicuously enough. It’s just the insides of a mundane hallway. Then the walls start to degrade and mingle with mud like your heading into some kind of underground hold. Then the walls start to degrade and mingle with mud like your heading into some kind of underground hold. ntil the right passage dumps you out into the trees crown, intertwined between the columns and stairs of the room’s architecture.











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A 647m voyage with entertainment from budget effects, garish lighting and dreadful props, the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel is a transport mode that guarantees to get you to Pǔdōng in an altered state. Stepping from the trains at the terminus, visitors are visibly nonplussed, their disbelief surpassed only by those with return tickets.





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A 23-year-old body art enthusiast has created giant flesh tunnels through his cheeks with a side view of his teeth. Joel Miggler, a German model, said he had been experimenting with different ‘art’ since he was 13 years old. First he began stretching his earlobe, then he forked his tongue, then somehow it morphed into stretching his cheeks in to two giant holes. Miggler said the unusual body art doesn’t have a particular name – but he aims to increase their size to 40mm. ‘I’ve cut them three times and stretched them many millimetres. They are now 36mm wide.’. Miggler says eating is difficult but he simply ‘plugs’ the holes like a bathtub when he wants to eat soup.





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In other news – Kidderminster College are nearing completion of their tunnel system – the weird thing is with a tunnel system is the closer to completion the less you see of it as it nestles under black plastic and then a skim of soil – but what is magical is what it hides inside and I am sure they can’t wait to finish it and get young people working inside it as a team!






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Olafur Eliasson’s colorful glass tunnel comes to life when you stroll through it one way, but if you look back over your shoulder, the panels appear black. The mesmerizing, kaleidoscope-like tunnel is comprised of stained glass triangles held together with bold, black piping. When viewed from one end, the tunnel is a rainbow of purple, pink and yellow, but the interesting one-way effect masks the colors from the other side.







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Chad Hudspeth believes that a nuclear strike resulting in a genocidal siege is a real possibility. At his home in Arizona, he is working on executing the biggest prep of his life -- a 140-foot-long escape tunnel from his family's house to a bug-out vehicle.







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The idea is that The Tunnel is a slickly produced documentary that's similar in nature to television shows like "Ghost Hunters," only with far darker and more dire events transpiring. It's bolstered by an meticulously researched introduction, wherein Natasha talks about the in-depth investigation she undertook before they enter the tunnels. There's an astonishing attention to detail as they discuss the history of the tunnels (which actually exist and where filming took place), and it deftly weaves truth, fiction and speculation into a fascinating tapestry. But the true star of the film is the tunnels themselves, which were used for location shooting. Dark, grimy, filled with graffiti and scattered, aged detritus, the tunnels evolve into their own characters.





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a tunnel fort I made in my backyard





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So many deaths were involved over the 24 years of the Hoosac Tunnel's construction, the crew refered to it as the ‘Bloody Pit’. On a warm June morning this past summer, we packed up our SUV’s and headed up to the Berkshires. Dressed in our mismatched dark clothing, we headed to the tracks. The East entrance is beautiful and foreboding all at the same time. It was creepy watching the mist bellow from the black hole. The darkness literally devours us with an intense sense of claustrophobia. The fractures in the walls are pouring water down and you eventually become covered in a greasy liquid that I don’t dare call water. I was convinced that I could hear and see things. A shadow beside you in the recesses of the cave. A moaning and thumping that can only be described as a brutal bludgeoning. You can literally feel the oppressiveness of the cave. There is a sadness and anguish to it. Its like the rocks are talking to you but you can’t understand it. But you have to hear it and feel it, it's everywhere. We decided that we would turn off our flash lights and go into total darkness and silence. I was starting to feel insanely nauseous. I was honestly concerned that I was going to throw up on the tracks when something literally screamed at me to stop. What I saw in front of me is nearly impossible to describe. Everything was a foggy blue. It was just there, inside the tunnel, underneath tons and tons of Berkshire rock and mountain. Its mass took up the whole of the tunnel in front of me, like a wall. It was thick and thin, jagged and smooth all at the same time. It was definitely moving towards us though. It was absolutely silent in the tunnel but there was a sound so loud that I wanted to cover my ears. You ever have those moments before something awful happens where it’s very quiet and you have those matter of fact thoughts? Mine was gibberish. Like I had lost all capability to think.





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rubén d´hers, chords tunnel #1, 40 acoustic guitars, cable and motors





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Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology measured the brain activity of participants with an MRI while they watched scenes from thriller flicks, including Hitchcock’s "North by Northwest" and "The Man Who Knew Too Much," as well as "Alien" and "Misery." While the participants watched the movies on a screen, a flashing checkerboard pattern also appeared around the sides. The researchers found that during moments of tension in the film's narrative, the brain narrowed people’s vision and focused their attention more tightly into the sate commonly referred to as "tunnel vision", whereas during less suspenseful moments, participants were more mindful of their surroundings. The results of the study are set to be published in the journal Neuroscience. "Many people have a feeling that we get lost in the story while watching a good movie and that the theater disappears around us," Matt Bezdek, the study’s lead author, said in a press release. "Now we have brain evidence to support the idea that people are figuratively transported into the narrative."



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Videos filmed in the weird freaky tunnel. Location will stay safe for now, it is very dangerous to get to. I'd recommend bringing a firearm and a flare gun.







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Before the age of computers, wind tunnels were large tubes with air moving inside. The tunnels were used to copy the actions of an object in flight. Researchers used wind tunnels to learn more about how an aircraft would fly. NASA used wind tunnels to test scale models of aircraft and spacecraft. Some wind tunnels were big enough to hold full-size versions of vehicles. The wind tunnel moved air around an object, making it seem like the object was really flying.











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Some locals of GuiZhou Province, China claim that a 400-meter-long tunnel can distort time. Those who drive through the tunnel, located in Zunyi City’s Honghuagang District, find the time on their cell phones — and only their cell phones — inexplicably reversed by exactly one hour. The tunnel was built years ago, but locals have only encountered its strange time travel side effects in the past year or so. Enter the tunnel at 7:00 am and exit a mere five minutes later at 7:05 am. But when you exit the other side of the tunnel, your cell phone will read 6:05 am, one hour earlier. The phone will correct itself after a while, say a mile out of the tunnel, when it syncs back up to the actual time. Since November 2012, reporters from the Chinese news outlet Gui Yang Evening News have apparently tested out China’s time travel tunnel on multiple occasions, using their own cell phones. They’ve found that the time reversal occurs 80% of the time. Tests from telecom operators haven’t detected anything abnormal, though.





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Argentinean artist Leandro Erlich's Elevator Shaft (2011) reconstructed with painstaking detail the interior of a well-worn shaft, turned 90 degrees, creating a slender hallway with the crusted underside of an elevator car at one end. Overhead the metal doors of adjacent floors leaked skinny triangles of light onto flayed cables and ropes and counterweights. An elevator shaft is a space people usually plunge through, and thinking about that had a vertiginous effect, compounded by the fact that Erlich was careful not to compromise the totality of his illusion.







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Cindy in the Blue Ghost Tunnel, St. Catharines


In this photo there appears to be a dog's head that formed, looking right at Cindy.


Now this picture shows something that is not of this world. You can see a creature that appeared to be moving within the tunnel that had a long body to it, showing the head of the creature and from the head it shows what would be the vertebrae. It also shows faintly one leg that comes from the vertebrae. My guess would be if this creature were alive this leg would be how the creature moves along.


In this photo it looks like a deformed skull. There was a train accident at the west end of the tunnel. Could this be one of the engineers that may have had his head smashed in from the wreck?


In this photo it shows a form of a dog with its head looking back. It appears to be that of a doberman in ecto form. The form can be seen in the ecto mist from the bottom reaching to the center of the picture.


Again another weird looking creature starting to form from the tunnel. This time the head of the creature is in the center with its legs out in front of it, the body going to the left in ecto form.


I have circled the two entities. The one that is closest to the ground appears to be a cat, the larger one to the right appears to be a large dog. Both are faint but they are there.



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Soon there will be a new way of taking in Iceland's second largest ice cap near Reykjavik – from an underground tunnel dug deep beneath the dense ice. Icecave Iceland is due to open in the spring of next year and will enable tourists to take in blue ice at the heart of the Langjökull glacier and understand how it formed. Engineers are currently carving the 1,640 foot (500 metre) long tunnel beneath the glacier and are installing lights to best show off the layers of ice. Langjökull glacier is located north east of Iceland's capital, Reykjavik. It's the is the second largest ice cap in Iceland with an area of 953 square kilometres.










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If you ever find yourself in the front row at Coors Field, I want you to stand right next to this guy and make it your personal mission to prevent him from snagging any baseballs. If, on the other hand, you’re there with kids, keep them far away from him. His name is Doug, and I think he’s a season ticket holder, but most importantly he’s a jerk and a maniac. Forget the fact that he had ignored me earlier when I complimented him for catching a ground-rule double, and listen to this… There was a home run ball hit right at us that barely sailed over our heads. We jumped for it, or at least *I* jumped for it. I don’t even know if he’s athletic enough to get both feet off the ground at the same time, but anyway, after we missed the ball, there was a brief lull when were both trying to figure out where it went. Suddenly we realized that it had landed in the tunnel directly behind us, and we started running. I didn’t take a pic of this tunnel, so you’ll have to settle for this cheap drawing. Basically, where the tunnel goes underneath the stands, the left half is blocked by a concrete wall, and the right half has an open door. The ball had rolled through the door, and I was running straight for the opening, about to zoom past this guy Doug when he realized he was about to get beat so he elbowed me from the right side and shoved me into the wall on the left as he kept running…and he ended up getting the ball. I couldn’t retaliate with a shove of my own because my every move was being witnessed and captured by the Associated Press.





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One Up the Tunnel is another tale in the gay sex stories series by respected author Darren Harjor. Jake wakes up from a rather blurry night our, and realizes he's not alone! Who's this guy in his bed? And why are the covers obstructing his otherwise naked body? All will be reviled... Literally! Another premium gay sex story for men that will have you begging for more! This gay erotica story is approximately 3100 words long.





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chinese conceptual artist zhang huan's latest exhibition 'hope tunnel' is a curated social project related to the 2008 earthquake in wenchuan, sichuan province. the show features the remains of the train which crashed during that period of disaster, killing hundreds of people. according to huan, it allows people to reflect on the scale of the catastrophe and commemorate the victims.






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A glance at a star-nosed mole (Condylura cristata) is enough to convince most people that something very strange has evolved in the bogs and wetlands of North America. There’s nothing else on the planet quite like this little palm-sized mammal. Its nose is ringed by 22 fleshy appendages, called rays, which are engorged with blood and in a constant flurry of motion when the animal searches for food. What is this star? How did it evolve and what is it for? What advantage would be worth sporting such an ungainly structure?






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Annoying cow stuck in a tunnel song





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A while back, quite a while back, I read of a lady who once lived in Romania. She was one of the worst temptress, murderess, cosmic screw ups, historically on this plane. Everything wise- she did just the opposite to. Her life was full of receiving terror and giving terror. Her name – Lady Erzsebet Bathory, of Transylvania. What lead me to re-examine her life and her ways, was born more from a state curiosity, in the back of my mind I felt that there is a hook here into the Inner Earth, after all distraction and attraction work for one primal goal of the universe’s intelligence – to reveal, reveal-ation. I had taken up reading werewolves and vampires again, since I had spoke with one individual concerning the adaptation of monatomic gold into the body through the taking of blood of the priestess’ of Egypt. A direct line of wisdom purportedly secreted in the mysteries in Translyvania. Following receiving this information, I took journeys into portals around the planet and at one time was attacked viciously, barred from entering the Inner Earth, by creatures that come from this culture of vampires and werewolves. I then decided to take on task, the getting to the bottom of this, at least to satisfy my own need to know, and in that, still another major doorway to the Inner Earth, cracked open. But first I need to find the ‘place of awares’ (the ritual altar), walk down the weirding hallway, enter several circuitous routes, travel through 3 large caverns…before entering the high expansive caverns containing the long plains of the Middle Earth. How wonderful the Inner Earth is.






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p.s. Hey. ** Tosh Berman, Hi, Tosh. Ah, visual artists. Good people. Well, to generalize grotesquely, but ... in my experience, let's say. Mostly. That's interesting about the fear of wide open spaces. A good friend of mine has that. He often has the hug the walls when walking through large rooms. For me, it would be the height. Height fears. Wobbly knees, dizzy. I feel for you, bro. Pym's a lot of fun. And can be addictive. Like Compton-Burnett but not as addictive as her work. Psychologically addictive rather than purely aesthetically addictive. Or I don't know. I think you will enjoy her. ** David Ehrenstein, Hi. Back in the mid-80s, almost every writer I knew and liked was enthusiastically reading Pym at one point. And Henry Green. They were cuisine. ** Bill, Hi, Bill. Then you'll like her sentences. They can be very often exquisitely sawed off like that. I've noted that Ray Cluley book for searching purposes. Thanks! Hope you won every one of those races. ** Steevee, Yay! Yeah, I do think those theories about Trump are a bit conspiracy-ish maybe. But it's weird to be an intelligent, curious person trying to figure out how he could happen as he's currently happening, and why not have fun with the horror. So curious to see what happens. It really seems very difficult to predict how his thing will end and what the consequences will be, which is kind of scarily exciting. That is a tricky situation with the outlets. I've been somewhere like there too, ugh. Unless the outlet with whom the confusion arose have really weird ego issues, I would think it'll be okay. Hope so. ** Thomas Moronic, Hi, T. She's a really good, odd sentence maker. If you're into sentence construction, and I think you're like me in that regard, she has a very good, gracefully off key touch or something. Sadly, the Fahey/Krayola album has apparently either gotten permanently lost or destroyed, so I think we're screwed. 'Self-producing' a novel. That's so nice. Totally. One of writing's many, many boons. Sure, later in week is good. Let's find an agreeable time, which shouldn't be too hard on my end. Let me know when you have a sense of when would be good. ** _Black_Acrylic, Thanks, man. Congrats on the new stylus! I'll go hear what you heard but, sadly, without the divine help of a stylus. Sounds sweet. ** H, Hi. She's lovely in her quite unique way. Oh, cool about the possible Brainard/Ashbery book post. I love that book a lot, naturally. Sure, I'm happy to offer advice on the Jarman one if need be. Oh, it's a pleasure for me and everyone else, I assure you! ** Misanthrope, Hi, G. Aw, gosh, thanks, and, you know what? I don't have a robot who makes the blog for me despite rumors to that effect, and I do need to hear that at least every once in a while, so thank you again. Yeah, I agree with you totally about sex crimes. It just seems like, well, if there is the kind of sex in prison that you hear about, it's very complicated sex due to the supposed power issues that prisoners have and deal with in that context, so I would guess that, if true, they're looking for an excuse to have forced, controlling sex without guilt or whatever, and, in their hothouse logic, someone who committed a sex crime becomes the prisoner equivalent of a slut relative to other prisoners, and, thus, fair game or something? Six hours is better. Seven seems like almost enough. Huh, interesting about the U and the B. Ha ha, and you were saying wrestling wasn't fake. All power to the U! Uh, I really don't need a TV addiction for sure, otherwise I might spring for that channel. ** Mark Gluth, Hi, Mark! Exactly. Beautiful way to put Pym's thing. Yeah. We don't know when we'll film it yet. We don't even have a producer for it yet. We have raised some money to make it. Not enough, but a good start. I would love to start filming sometime later this year, but that could be optimistic. Bon Tuesday! ** Alistair McCartney, Hi, A. Yeah, but it's weird because each of the subsequent births will be colored by whatever 'buzz' there is about the film based on the initial birth(s). Not that I've been in this situation before, but it seems like that. We'll see. I would guess that the film will probably play at Outfest, but it's the producers who decide and choose those things, with Zac's and my input and, hopefully, approval. But it seems pretty likely unless a good, earlier LA opportunity arises. I'd rather not have to wait a whole year for the film to screen in LA. I really wanted to see that Greenaway film when it was playing here a few weeks ago, but I just never made it to the theater. But I will see it. Interesting. Year's end! So exciting, my pal! Love, me. ** Rewritedept, Hi. Busy is quite frequently good for me. Yeah, I mean days off are days off, right? It's so weird how parents find it so hard to stop controlling their kids' lives at a reasonable point. When will your promotion go through? You don't know? ** Okay. What's today? Oh, right, another themed one. Tunnels. See if I did the topic satisfactorily. See you tomorrow.